Rolf Hochhuth

YOU HAVE GOT TO HAVE PLANS

“It was Adorno who, after the war, and that’s already over 60 years ago, rekindled in Germany the tradition of a critical evaluation of one’s environment, in the form of the Minima Moralia,” states Hochhuth. Hochhuth’s aphorisms, unlike Adorno’s, are not grounded in ethics. They are necessarily amoral because they examine the three arenas that together constitute each and every human life: the private, the political/historic and the artistic.

Over the course of his long and distinguished career as a playwright, poet and essayist, Hochhuth has time and again examined and reexamined these three arenas and their interrelationship. For example when examining the motives of the Pope during the Holocaust, or Churchill’s actions relating to the death of Sikorski, prime minister of the Polish government in exile. His aphorisms are pointed and brilliantly succinct, yet they are also detailed discourses on human relationships, history and art; they are quintessential for his multi-faceted and engaging oeuvre.

Rolf Hochhuth

Rolf Hochhuth

was born in 1931 in Eschwege, and was working as a publishing editor when, on a trip to Rome, he started conceptual work on his first play, Der Stellvertreter (The Deputy). Staged for the first time in 1963 by Erwin Piscator in Berlin, the piece gained attention worldwide. Over the years, Hochhuth has produced a large body of plays, essays and poetry, for which he has received many awards. He lives in Berlin.  

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